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This Week’s Movies

May 21, 2014 / by / 0 Comment

Even though summer seems to have hit Geneva this week, we should always make time for a good movie! Here are the latest movies set to grace our screens this week… Deux jours, une nuit Length: 1h35mins The film tells the story of Sandra, who with the help of her husband, tries to convince her colleagues to forgo their bonuses so she can keep her job. Nominated for Cannes Film festival 2014, this drama is most certainly not short of tears, hugs and raw emotion, focusing on some of the financial struggles of recent times. Pros & Cons + The powerful shots throughout – A little depressing, dispite being emotive   The Homesman Length: 2h02mins Based on a novel of the same name by Glendon Swarthout, The Homesman is a Western film about the story of a man, rescued and obliged to help a self-sufficient unmarried woman with the job of transporting three insane woman East across the land. This film is set to be shocking, somewhat romantic and strangely funny, all at once! Pros & Cons: + Strong performances yet understated characters – Potentially disappointing for those who have read the novel   X-Men: Days of Future Past Length: 2h11mins Wolverine […]

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Art Galleries – contemporary art

April 28, 2014 / by / 0 Comment

Here you can find a list of the contemporary art Galleries in Geneva with latest exhibitions and new openings;

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The Sound of Summer: Concerts d’été en Vieille Ville

April 05, 2014 / by / 0 Comment

During the summer, Geneva’s old town is proudly welcoming guests for a series of live musical performances. Concerts begin on 27th June and will run throughout the summer until mid-August. Last Summer, I decided to head down to the old town this lunchtime to find out more…

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Tutankhamun, his tomb and his treasures; 20 September – 12 January

September 17, 2013 / by / 0 Comment

An exhibition dedicated to the tomb of Tutankhamun is starting this week in Palexpo, Geneva. Tutankhamun, the 11th pharaoh of the 18th dynasty of Ancient Egypt, was unremarkable, but became famous due to the discovery of his completely intact tomb by the British archaeologist Howard Carter in 1922. The discovery of Tutankhamun’s mummy revealed that he was about 17 when he died and was likely to have inherited the throne at the age of eight or nine. He is thought to have been the son of Akhenaten, commonly known as the ‘heretic king’. According to the most important document of Tutankhamun’s reign, the Restoration Stele, his father’s supposed reforms left the country in a bad state. Consequently the traditional gods, seeing their temples in ruins and their cults abolished, had abandoned Egypt to chaos. When Tutankhamun came to the throne, his administration restored the old religion and moved the capital from Akhetaten back to its traditional home at Memphis. He changed his name from Tutankhaten – ‘living image of Aten [the sun god]’ – to Tutankhamun, in honour of Amun. His queen, Ankhesenpaaten, the third daughter of Akhenaten and Nefertiti, also changed the name on her throne to read Ankhesenamun. […]

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The Humanitarian Adventure

June 02, 2013 / by / 0 Comment

The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Museum (IRCM) presents its new permanent exhibition The Humanitarian Adventure. The visitors are invited to discover an exhibition that has been completely reworked by a trio of international architects – Shigeru Ban (Japan), Gringo Cardia (Brazil) and Diébédo Francis Kéré (Burkina Faso) – coordinated by the Swiss architects atelier oï. Twenty-five years after it first opened, the Museum needed to reflect today’s changing world, and particularly the changes affecting humanitarian action. The Humanitarian Adventure is a new permanent exhibition planned around three crucial topics: Defending human dignity, Restoring family links and Reducing natural risks. Released from a perspective primarily guided by history, the new-style museography looks to the future and brings a message of hope.   Two first-class academic partners were chosen to take part in The Humanitarian Adventure: EPFL+ECAL Lab, which designed the immersive installation entitled The Colours of Dignity, and the HEAD – Genève, whose students in cinema made a series of new montages using films from the existing Museum collection.   This exhibition is full of emotion, discovery and reflection, a unique opportunity to enter into the history of humanitarian action. An interactive chronology unfurls 150 years of humanitarian history, […]

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Mapping Festival Geneva; 2 — 12 May 2013 ⁄ 9th Edition; Visual Audio & amp; Deviant Electronics

April 28, 2013 / by / 0 Comment

Created in 2005, the Mapping Festival is already at its ninth edition. Year after year, it continues to attract a broader public and to put an emphasis on the most forefront artists while introducing their work and creations built of all kinds of new and innovative technologies. The Mapping Festival is a multidisciplinary festival dedicated to audio-visual arts and digital cultures. As the sole broadcasting space of this magnitude in Switzerland, the festival is now also recognised internationally. Mapping Festival offers every year audio-visual performances, installations, clubbing parties, live performances, architectural mapping, as well as workshops and conferences. Thus, with a call for proposals that is open to all and an artistic committee composed of several employees who have been working in the field for many years, the curatorial choices aim at an edgy, diverse and curiosity-inspiring programming for both novices and professionals. Thanks to this unique diversity aspect, the festival is recognised as a major event, a real experimental meeting space, for creation and exchange with its innovative thinking in the field of audio-visual arts. HEADQUARTERS OF MAPPING FESTIVAL Tickets, merchandising, bar! “Le Commun” du Bâtiment d’art contemporain (BAC) 28 rue des Bains – 1205 Geneva Exhibition open everyday (except […]

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Global Affairs – Investigations on the web – by Kurt Caviezel at the Center of Photography, Geneva

March 30, 2013 / by / 0 Comment

“Suddenly the camera has a thousand eyes. Lenses interconnect and become a single constantly photographing camera; the screen at home is the viewfinder, the mouse is the catcher, the webcam the optical device.” (Kurt Caviezel) Kurt Caviezel, born in Chur in 1964, photographs the world using publicly accessible web cams. He does not operate like a conventional photographer – in a particular place with a camera ready to capture that “decisive moment” in the flow of real events. Instead he sits at home at his computer, “strolls” per mouse click through the whole Internet and collects images that appear briefly on his screen before being overwritten again by subsequent images. These images are from all realms of life, foreseeable images as well as totally surprising images. What Kurt Caviezel observes on his screen and stores on the hard disc of his computer are fragments from an infinite flood of images produced by thousands of web cams distributed all over the globe. That flow suggests a global perspective and pretends to illuminate all corners of the earth, but the image of the world it actually provides is merely fragmentary, sometimes at a time lag and with quite a number of image […]

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“Windows from the Renaissance to the Present Durer, Monet, Magritte…” at Fondation de l’Hermitage, through MAY 20, 2013

March 03, 2013 / by / 0 Comment

The window theme has always fascinated artists across the centuries. “Windows, from the Renaissance to the Present Durer, Monet, Magritte…” offers a look at this theme, showing its significant role in Western iconography from the 15th century to the current day. The exhibition brings together more than 150 works from Swiss and European galleries, as well as from numerous, prestigious private collections. Linked to the research on perspective carried out during the Renaissance, the window has constantly been reinterpreted throughout different historical periods and artistic movements. Until the end of the 19th century, artists used its frame to guide our eyes towards ideal landscapes, realist panoramas, or, on the contrary, to allow light to filter indoors. Many artists have subsequently integrated the window and its reflections in order to establish the limits between interior and exterior. In time, from a simple decorative element, the window has gradually become a subject itself. The window’s opening, frame and light, allow artists to explore new territories, some of which have led to the discovery of an abstract and minimalist art. This thematic exhibition has gathered 500 years of art history and includes major artists such as Dürer, Dou, Constable, Monet, Hammershøi, Munch, Delaunay, […]

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Chagall : Modern Master in Zurich until 12 May 2013

February 17, 2013 / by / 0 Comment

The Kunsthaus Zürich is showing an exhibition featuring some 90 paintings and works on paper by Marc Chagall (1887–1985). Chagall is one of the best-known and most popular artists of the 20th century. His images of Russian village life, floating figures, flying cows and roosters are famous. The exhibition focuses on the years from 1911 to 1922 – a formative period in Chagall’s artistic career. During these crucial years Chagall established himself as a pioneer of modern art, and consolidated his unique visual language to create pictures that were to form the core of his art for the rest of his life. Covered with imagery drawn from Jewish ritual and folklore, Chagall’s paintings of these years responded to the stimuli of the emerging avant-garde styles as well as to the art of the past. Chagall experienced modernism’s “golden age” in Paris before the First World War, and combined elements of Fauvism, Cubism and Orphism to produce his dreamlike visions that were in turn to influence Expressionist and Surrealist art. During his stay in Russia between 1914 and 1922, Chagall encountered the monotonous artistic trends of Suprematism and Constructivism. Throughout these artistic phases Chagall kept his identity as a Jewish artist. […]

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Vertigo at Xippas contemporary art gallery, Geneva (until March 9, 2013)

February 10, 2013 / by / 0 Comment

Darren Almond/Céleste Boursier-Mougenot/ Petros Chrisostomou/Panos Kokkinias/Dean Monogenis/Vik Muniz/ Philippe Ramette/Denis Savary. Vertigo is a group exhibition gathering works made by several internationally known artists that exploit this theme by different means such as painting, drawing, sculpture, photography and audio installation. Vertigo refers to the fear of emptiness, wide spaces, disappearance, dangerous situations, transformation, or even punishment. More than just a paralysing psychological reaction, the vertigo sensation can also serve as the basis for a new reflection on objects, the body, architecture and landscapes, as well as on our myths and references. About the artists: Darren Almond, born in 1971 in Wigan UK, works and lives in London. He is an artist traveller. In each of his works, he communicates and redefines his own notions of time, space, duration and collective memory. From his point of view, time contracts and dilates in order to become something flexible. Inspired by the concept of geographical borders and the importance of reaching them, the artist goes to remote places to capture the point where space, time and history cross. Associated since 1997 with the Young British Artists, he has been for 10 years the subject of important one-man shows, including the one at the […]

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