Salève


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Be a tourist in Geneva for the day! My top 5 activities that you may have missed out on.

April 10, 2014 / by / 0 Comment

I have been living in Geneva for a while now, and I feel that I know the city and its surroundings pretty well. I have ridden the nocturn bus from Rive to Gex, scrambled for a parking space in Eaux-Vives and dodged tourists when I’m late for work as they gawk at the chair outside of the UN.

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Up the Salève

March 03, 2013 / by / 0 Comment

If you haven’t been up the Salève in winter yet, don’t miss the opportunity before the snow is gone ! You can go sledging, snowshoeing and cross-country skiing. If you prefer just to enjoy a short walk and a nice meal it’s also possible. The Salève is the closest mountain from Geneva, right across the border.  Right now the cable car is unfortunately closed till April so you need a car to go up unless you fancy hiking. In that case take bus 8 to Veyrier and start from there. You can join a free guided hike every Sunday (leaving from Veyrier Douane bus stop at 10am). Make sure you have the right clothing. You don’t need to register. Expect a long hike (5 to 8 hours). Otherwise La Croisette (in Muraz) is probably the best place to start from. To get to La Croisette you need to drive through Collonges-Sous-Salève and via to Le Coin. At the top you will find the Auberge des Montagnards with a big terrace with a great view. Cheese dishes and blueberry pies expect you. You can’t book so get there early if you want more than a hot chocolate. More websites on the Salève: Information […]

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Shooting Stars – No Telescope Necessary!

August 14, 2012 / by / 0 Comment

For those of you who have an interest in star-gazing, or even those of you who don’t know your Big Dipper from Orion’s Belt, August is a pretty spectacular month for glancing skywards! Every year in August there is a vast increase in the amount of shooting stars that can be seen on a clear night. In fact, these shooting stars are actually tiny pieces of asteroid – usually no bigger than a grain of rice – that burn up as they enter the Earth’s atmosphere; thus creating the bright flash that we call a shooting star. Around a dozen times per year, Earth passes through streams of dust that are left around the Sun by comets, and this triggers an increase in shooting stars. Out of the various times to catch a glimpse of this phenomenon, the best time to look is on the night of the 12th of August. The meteor shower that occurs at this time of year is caused by debris from the comet Swift-Tuttle which only crosses our solar system every 133 years, with 1992 being its last appearance. Despite the comet being rarely visible, however, the Swift-Tuttle still leaves a trail of space dust and pieces […]

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